Gothmog on Warg: GW Philadelphia WotR Overall Winner

I really wanted to do a brief post and share a cool contest winning model I painted for a contest last year. I was living in Philadelphia during the War of the Ring rules release and I was painting and hanging out at an excellently staffed GW in Philadelphia. For the release GW sponsored a painting contest.
Gothmog

Gothmog

Gothmog

GothmogGothmog
Gothmog

Gothmog


This Gothmog on a warg was my single figure entry. It has a small conversion element that I think is seamless but adds a ton of character to the piece. The conversion was a head-swap of the warg with the wild warg chieftain. My reasoning was that Gothmog’s personal warg was probably involved in many conflicts and would be scarred. The wild warg chieftain has an awesome eye scar that just looks so great!
For the painting I placed my laptop next to my painting desk and watched the siege of the Minas Tirith over and over again. I think I replicated Gothmog’s uniform (as much as orcs have uniforms) well. This was an easy figure for me to fall in love with and taking the top prize allowed me two free tickets to Game’s Day. I have a genuine love of LotR miniatures. The Perry brothers really captured the feel of the books and movies and I do feel that these are just some of the best minis around. Which would probably explain the rampant fanboy love I threw their way when I met them and had them autograph my Perry Brother’s retrospective!

Till next time…

-GPC

Back in Black

I’m back with more commission paint work and other jib-jab. If you want to know what I have been up to over the last month check out Phantom of the Attic’s blog as I have been writing, painting miniatures for, organizing, and running The Perfect Swarm gaming event in an ever more desperate attempt at gaming greatness! Please check it out! I know you’ll like it.

Paladin Front


Paladin Side


So… on with some other painting… This fantasy figure was a recent commission for RPG writer Jason Vey. The color scheme he requested is bold and appealing. For those of you thinking up color schemes black and yellow is a “no brainer” (among many others… might be a good topic for an article) color scheme. He requested some red as well which I feel really adds some excitement to the piece. I particularly enjoyed detailing the shield design, and as usual its another great Reaper figure. Overall we were both very happy with the results. Hope you like it!

—GPC

Azazel (Fallen Angel Terminator Sorcerer Lord)

Azazel

Hello people of the internet. Sorry for the delay since my last posting, but I got caught in what I call the “holiday crush” ™. That is when the recent holiday season’s obligations make it hard to get any good miniature photography done and though I have been painting regularly I had not updated till now.

Anyway, formalities aside I present you with Azazel Sorcerer of the Fallen Angel Chaos Space Marines. I envisioned this model as the brooding leader of band of Dark Angel turn coats. Starting his career as a librarian (pre-heresey) he dabbled in the dark arts and when some of the Dark Angels turned to the forces of Chaos he gladly switched allegiances to continue his pursuit of the mystical and occult.

This model has an interesting history. It and a few other seemingly limited run models were sculpted during one of GW’s global event campaigns. Interestingly it was released and then soon after (maybe half a year) the Chaos Space Marine Codex was rewritten and a plastic multi-part lord was released. Unfortunately for this awesome sculpt, the plastic lord kit totally overshadowed it, and that really is a shame. It is well sculpted, has super sharp details, and really captures the intangiable “feel” of chaos. The armor appears ancient, but resonates power, and perhaps as a precursor to the current kits, the blister included four weapon options. The problem being that their were only two options for each arm so you might want a combination that you can’t make (which i deal with in the next paragraph). All I can say is that I love this miniature!

Azazel

Azazel


As I undertook building the model I set a scene in my mind. I imagined the sorcerer lord striding over broken asphalt blazing away at guardsmen or loyalist marines with bolts of arcane energy. I wanted him to be pointing as well (either as a leadership gesture or in challenge to an enemy). As such I wanted to use the sword (which I imagine is a force sword) and the dragon headed plasma gun (kai gun?). As such I did have a problem… these were both right handed weapon options. So I first looked at the arms and I knew I could really only do a conversion with the kai gun because the gun was symmetrical, and, as such, would look the same on either side. So I cut the gun and the power claw arms at the elbow and pinned them together I then resculpted the elbow pad and tubes. Finally I covered up the difficult cable and chain coupling with a cool skull bolt bit from my bits box. With both arms complete and ready to go I moved on to building the base.
Azazel

Azazel


To create the broken asphalt I first took some thin cork board and broke pieces off it till it fit the base. The next step was to add details to make it look like broken concrete. I pushed sniped and bent paper clip bits at odd angles to create rebarr and then I clipped a small brush protector to make a broken pipe.

Lastly I thought that it was silly for a sorcerer not to have a familiar and when I saw the clock work angel from the Empire General sprue I knew what it had to be. The clockwork angel was clipped, trimmed and pinned to the rear of the lord’s armor using a straightened paper clip. I imagined he would hover over the lord bearing tides of woe to his enemies (the banner ended up with the phrase Vae Victus, similar to the Warhammer Online advert).

Azazel

Azazel


That done, I was able to pin and base the body of the model and prime. The arms were left off so that I did not obstruct the detail. I painted the miniature using a similar scheme to the traditional Dark Angels, with some twists. One particular detail to note was the use of the broken sword motif on the ancient robe to show his former allegiance.

I hope this gives you some more ideas on generating a story to inspire your miniature building and converting.

Happy Hobbydays!

-GPC

PS. Coming Up: My award winning LotR Mounted Gothmog, more commissions, and Ancient Romans… not necessarily in that order!

Dr. Mortimer Klump (Wyrd Miniatures: Morgue Assistant Sebastian)

Dr. Klump

Dr. Klump

Happy Holidays from GPC! I recently joined a Starblazer Adventures RPG and I needed a miniature to represent my character Dr. Mortimer Klump. The character is a mad scientist with a heart of gold and a diamond edged bonesaw. With his fellow Starhunters he pursues intergalactic war criminals from an organization known as the Instrumentality.

This model was extremely enjoyable to paint. It is Morgue Assistant Sebastian from the fantastic Wyrd Miniatures company. I kept this project warm and used earth tones for the outfit. I used two different layering methods to paint the white portions of the miniature and this would be an interesting opportunity to discuss them.

There are many ways to paint white, but like black it can be source of frustration. There are cool and warm mixes for white. The cool mixes tend to start with a gray or blue base. I used a gray base to paint the white hair of the good doctor. Starting with a light (neutral) gray and progressively adding white, but only using pure white for the final highlight.

I painted the apron and straps of the doctor using a warm palette mix for white (please bear in mind that the apron is a light tan/white and I did not envision the apron as a pure white; the more white you use for the mid-tone the more white it will look at the end). I began with a light brown, khaki type of tone and built up to white by first using a mix with light flesh (a cream type tone with some caucasian flesh tones in it), and then mixing in pure white for the final highlights. Overall this was a very enjoyable miniature to paint and I am looking forward to painting more miniatures from Wyrd.

~GPC

Ancient Deep One (Dagon Jr.)

Ancient Deep One

Ancient Deep One


Ancient Deep One

Ancient Deep One


Ancient Deep One

Ancient Deep One

Mortals beware! The earth quakes beneath the feet of this horror from 10,000 leagues! I created this ancient deep one for Realms of Cthulhu. The basis for the model is the Ghoul King miniature produced by Reaper Miniatures. Using two part epoxy putty I sculpted fins on the limbs and back. I created a blubbery fish finned neck to support a head swap using a growler head from the now defunct Vor miniature game. This is a great example of why as a miniature painter you should not throw any bits away. You never know when they will come in handy.

With the conversion finished I painted the flesh with a base-coat of P3 Trollblood base mixed with P3 Necrotic Flesh and Vallejo Black. I layered on progressive highlights by brightening the color with more Necrotic Flesh. One area of note is the fleshy meat that this monster is devouring. Massive trauma such as removed limbs are messy and do not lend themselves to a uniform layering. Instead, I used GW Mechrite Red layered with Vallejo Flat Red in the deep muscle, and the parts that might be torn flesh got a mix of P3 Midlund Flesh and GW Blood Red (just a tiny bit) built up with more Midlund Flesh and Vallejo Pale Flesh. I glazed the whole piece with GW Baal Red, and GW Leviathan Purple and GW Devlan Mud (in the deepest recesses). Finally, I gloss coated the monsters teeth and the “meatsicle” to give them a sickening shine.

Now to go devour some investigators!
~GPC

Ancient Deep One

Ancient Deep One


Ancient Deep One

Ancient Deep One

Deep Ones

Deep Ones

Deep Ones

H.P. Lovcraft is my favorite author and a huge inspiration for me when it comes to gaming. Recently, Reality Blurs published and excellent book for the Savage Worlds rules called Realms of Cthulhu. The short interview is that this book is simply amazing. It has inspired me to model and paint more miniatures for my pulp horror collection.

Deep Ones

Deep Ones

These are two of the recent additions. These Deep Ones are from the Strange Aeons miniature range. I met a member of the company at Gen Con and I was really impressed by the Strange Aeons rulebook and miniatures. Now admittedly these miniatures have some flaws (they lack polish), but please keep in mind that the company and sculptor are new and will only continue to grow in skill. These are some of my favorite depictions of Deep Ones. The models are really characterful and were very fun to paint. I am particularly partial to the hunched backed one as he has a really fun face (with a mouth full of misshapen teeth).

~GPC

Deep One

Deep One

Ancient Celt (Historical Sample)

Ancient Celt

Ancient Celt


Ancient Celt

Ancient Celt

One thing I really needed to expand my miniature painting portfolio were more samples of historical figures. I picked an ancient Celt from the really excellent Warlord Games Celt Box-set. Warlord really has created some excellent figures for this range. I found the sprue to be clean and user friendly. The details were very crisp and the figures seemed to accurately represent ancient Celtic warriors (according to illustrations found in Warfare in the Classical World by John Warry, as well as some oline research).

Painting historical miniatures is different from painting fantasy, sci-fi, or superheros. Yes, I know this seems childishly simple, but it is something you should think about before painting. It just changes your entire approach. For example lets look at color selection. When I am choosing colors for a fantasy figure I’m looking at the pose, the facial expressions, the gear, and I am asking myself questions: “What is the mood I want to inspire as I paint this figure? What are the materials his/her clothes are made of? How would this character dress?”

For a historical figure I need to do research. Warriors in historical armies had uniforms and looked a certain way. Depending on how organized the army was this can be extremely specific (Napoleonic uniforms) or more vague. This Celt falls into that vague range. The Celts wore clothes that looked a certain way (due to available materials and the fashion of the day), but generally did not have an army uniform. Now books like Warfare in the Classical World show pictures of these warriors and you can get an idea of how they should look, but it is up to you, the craftsmen, to interpret them. What colors would be available to dye clothes? What are some traditional designs used by that culture? Questions like these will help you refine your work and the added realism will help bring your miniature creation to life.

Now go, expand your horizons! Grab a historical mini and an Osprey Book and let slip the dogs of war!
~GPC

Ancient Celt

Ancient Celt


Ancient Celt

Ancient Celt