Ancient Celt (Historical Sample)

Ancient Celt

Ancient Celt


Ancient Celt

Ancient Celt

One thing I really needed to expand my miniature painting portfolio were more samples of historical figures. I picked an ancient Celt from the really excellent Warlord Games Celt Box-set. Warlord really has created some excellent figures for this range. I found the sprue to be clean and user friendly. The details were very crisp and the figures seemed to accurately represent ancient Celtic warriors (according to illustrations found in Warfare in the Classical World by John Warry, as well as some oline research).

Painting historical miniatures is different from painting fantasy, sci-fi, or superheros. Yes, I know this seems childishly simple, but it is something you should think about before painting. It just changes your entire approach. For example lets look at color selection. When I am choosing colors for a fantasy figure I’m looking at the pose, the facial expressions, the gear, and I am asking myself questions: “What is the mood I want to inspire as I paint this figure? What are the materials his/her clothes are made of? How would this character dress?”

For a historical figure I need to do research. Warriors in historical armies had uniforms and looked a certain way. Depending on how organized the army was this can be extremely specific (Napoleonic uniforms) or more vague. This Celt falls into that vague range. The Celts wore clothes that looked a certain way (due to available materials and the fashion of the day), but generally did not have an army uniform. Now books like Warfare in the Classical World show pictures of these warriors and you can get an idea of how they should look, but it is up to you, the craftsmen, to interpret them. What colors would be available to dye clothes? What are some traditional designs used by that culture? Questions like these will help you refine your work and the added realism will help bring your miniature creation to life.

Now go, expand your horizons! Grab a historical mini and an Osprey Book and let slip the dogs of war!
~GPC

Ancient Celt

Ancient Celt


Ancient Celt

Ancient Celt

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Necromancer (Event Miniature)

There is nothing quite as enjoyable as painting a miniature you love. To revisit a common cliche its like “hanging out with an old friend.” That is how I felt when I painted this Mordheim Necromancer for Phantom of the Attic’s Warhammer Event: The Assault on Baldenhof Manor. The necromancer model was used to represent (unsurprisingly) the “Mad Necromancer of Baldenhof Manor” Anton Muller and played his role spectacularly commanding and raising the dead as well as blasting units with dark energy.

Necromancer Anton Muller

Necromancer Anton Muller

Necromancer Anton Muller

One point of interest on this piece was the painting of the skull raised over the necromancer’s head. To paint a skull such as this I start with a dark brown and over 3 to 4 stages I build up the highlights using first a browish ochre and slowly transitioning to a yellowy cream. There are many different colors that are useful, but I would most recommend the Foundry triple pack Boneyard. When painting a skull I save pure white for the teeth which makes the skull appear particularly menacing and adds some realism (the teeth of a skull tend to appear more white than the skull itself). Once again, painting using this layering technique is time consuming, but well worth it for the results.

Necromancer Anton Muller

Happy Painting!
~GPC

Mounted Archaon (Independent Commission)

Mounted Archaon
Mounted Archaon
Mounted Archaon
Mounted Archaon gave me the chance to stretch my creative muscles and try some new things. The customer for this commission gave me free reign to develop a color scheme and details. I painted the mounted Archaon in an identical manner to the Archaon on foot. I painted the horse’s flesh with GW Chardon Granite and built up the highlights based on that. For the sword and shield once again applied a fire technique.

Continuing with the fire theme I decided that the modeled base was a lava flow bursting from under Archaon’s steed (in response to his powerful presence). To make the base match up with Archaon on foot I used basing pumice on the base and on the sculpted details that came with the miniature. I didn’t like the idea that the spikes were bones so I painted them as lava spikes piercing up from the earth. The lava was painted in a similar manner to the flaming sword and shield. Archaon's Sword

In the Warhammer Chaos storyline Archaon comes from the Chaos Wastes. The frozen wasteland north of the Empire. As such I used made the base of rocky and snowy. What I really wanted to convey was that the lava was melting the snow. To do this I applied the scatter snow in the usual way with PVA glue. After doing so and applying Testor’s Dullcote over the entire model. Once the miniature had completely dried I went applied Vallejo Glosscote around and on parts of the scatter snow in a random fashion. This simple technique gave the impression that the snow around the erupting earth was melting
Base Detail
Base Detail
Base Detail
Happy miniature painting!
~GPC

Dwarf Lord with removeable Oathstone

I wanted to do a project that would give me an opportunity to use rare earth magnets (something I just had not had the chance to try out). This excellently sculpted Dwarf Lord by Games Workshop was perfect. As a part of the dwarf army a lord may have an oathstone. This stone when placed provides the lord with an elevated position to fight from, but more importantly sets the minds of his comrades to fight to the bitter end in defense of their lord and his sacred relic.

The first thing I did was clip the lord from his base tab. Then, using a Dremel tool on a low setting, I carefully drilled a hole and set a rare earth magnet in each foot. To secure the magnet I used Dwarf LordDwarf Lord on Oathstonetwo-part epoxy and superglue. I then made a two bases. The first base is a normal 20mm square base with a small square of thin sheet metal attached to it. Sand was sprinkled over the base except where the magnets would make contact. The base was finished with a variety of grays and some Woodland Scenics scatter snow.

The oathstone was made primarily out of pink foam. I cut and shaped it with a hobby knife and then roughed it up with some sand and white glue. I added an anvil symbol from my bit-box and hand-primed the oathstone (to prevent it from being damaged by the spray). Finally I painted the stone in a similar fashion to the other base.

I really enjoyed this project. It was a fun way to add a lot of character to an already awesome model. I hope it inspires you to try something new!Dwarf Lord Close Shot
~GPC

Wolf Thunder Warrior

While practicing miniature photography, I was reminded of a piece I had worked on over the summer. This is a Wolf Thunder Warrior from Kraken Editions really sweet Alkemy miniature game. I plan on doing a force of their great looking toad figures at some point, but I was really inspired by this particular model so I decided to create a display for it.

Wolf Thnder Warrior

Wolf Thunder Warrior

For the figure itself I was really inspired by the Native American theme that seemed to be pervasive in the Aurlok faction. I kept the colors cool: gray skin-tone, white feathers, blue warpaint. I really like the way the warpaint pattern turned out. I researched Native American warpaint schemes and I found a lot of really great pictures from old paintings and black and white photos, to current pictures from modern Native American gatherings. I did not chose the most elaborate scheme I could find. Instead, I chose a scheme that was simple and bold, and I limited the colors to a single color because I felt that these qualities would make the best transition to miniature.

Wolf Thunder Warrior

Wolf Thunder Warrior

After I completed the miniature I went to work on a display base. I started with an old peanut butter lid (of all things?!?!). First, I roughed up the surface and used white glue to apply a mix of fine and course sand. I selected a weathered stick I had found that looked to me like a miniature log. Some patches were left bare to serve as mud puddles. The base was primed black and then base-coated and dry-brushed the sand up to the highlight level I desired. I then painted the “log” in my normal layering style. I selected a mix of browns to make the bottom of the puddle and painted them directly onto the bare patches. To create the puddle I mixed some brown and green ink and some Vallejo Water Effects and slowly poured it onto the bare patch. It is a puddle so I left the water effects to one layer.

I hope this gives you some ideas of some cool things you can do with the awesome miniatures you have at home. Till next time…

~GPC

Archaon On Foot (Independent Commission)

Archaon

Archaon

Archaon

Archaon

Here is Archaon “The Everchosen!” This is one half of a independent commission I am currently working on. I chose to paint Archaon in black (similar to the GW sample), but strayed away from the reddish highlights and instead went for a true black.

Painting black comes up often on painting forums, but I think people make it harder than it has to be. This black armor is achieved by progressive layers of black mixed with white. Each layer I only add a tiny bit of white and I try to avoid finishing anywhere near even a dark gray (such as Vallejo German Gray). I build my highlights toward the raised areas where light would naturally collect. This is a time consuming technique but I find it to be effective.

~GPC

Monobot (Four Color Figures Commission)

This is another commission from Four Color Figures Superfigs line of miniatures. This is a Monobot. It is normally a henchmen figure (they are sold 5 in a pack and henchmen groups in the Super System game have a minimum of 5 models), but for the display purposes of this figure I wanted to concentrate on one model.

Monobot

Monobot

Monobot

Monobot

Monobot on homemade plinth.

Monobot on homemade plinth.

With the Monobot I had a strong color scheme in mind. I wanted to focus on warm colors (specifically red and yellow). So I used red as my primary color and yellow as my spot color. I knew I was going to include metallics in this piece (it is a robot after all) so I used the rusty metallic I described in my Obese Anti-Paladin post. The reds, browns, and oranges in that technique compliment the red and yellow. The yellow lens in the head was accomplished by applying increasingly lighter blends of yellow (Foundry Ochre) starting with the darkest yellow in the top right corner and working down to the bottom left. Paint in a curved motion that would follow the glass if it were real. Paint a small dot of white in the darkest area to simulate light shining off the lens. Cover the whole lens with gloss coat (I recommend Vallejo Gloss Coat).

I made the plinth using the lid from an old can of primer. I took the lid and using the same basing material I used on the model (Vallejo Basing Pumice), I formed a ring. I used a base as a guide so I would know the correct size to mold the material. I then primed the plinth and painted it like I would any base.

~GPC